The “Adorno and Identity” Seminars

The “Adorno and Identity” Seminars are supported by Princeton University’s Interdisciplinary Doctoral Program in the Humanities (IHUM), Arizona State University’s College of Integrative Sciences and Arts, and the University of California, Berkeley’s Department of Rhetoric

Critical Theory Program students, faculty, and friends may be interested in the series of upcoming Zoom-cast “Adorno and Identity” Seminars, co-curated by our colleague Fumi Okiji, together with Jon Catlin and Eric Oberle:

Negative dialectics, the critical theorist Theodor Adorno wrote, “is suspicious of all identity.” The concept of identity and its negations—nonidentity and negative identity—are woven throughout Adorno’s wide-ranging corpus. This interdisciplinary series of virtual seminars on “Adorno and Identity,” convened by Jonathon Catlin (Princeton), Eric Oberle (Arizona State), and Fumi Okiji (Berkeley), revisits Adorno’s thought at a moment in which political, cultural, legal, and psychological notions of identity have expanded relevance and vexed public meaning. Across these sessions, scholars from diverse fields will return to Adorno’s theoretical framework in order to collectively develop more robust notions of identity, nonidentity, and negative identity, and to advance critical theory by connecting Adorno’s work to broader conversations about identity in adjacent fields, including the study of race, gender, sexuality, and technology.

This series of virtual seminars will meet on Zoom every two weeks over the course of the spring 2021 semester, beginning Friday, Jan. 29 (10 am–12 pm Pacific US time, 1–3 pm EST). Each session will consist of two parts: three presentations of approximately 15 minutes each, followed by an hour of discussion amongst the participants and a public audience.

On the Adorno and Identity Seminars website you will find the current schedule. Please email Jonathon Catlin (jcatlin@princeton.edu) to join the email list. A Zoom link and outlines of the presentations will be provided on our website prior to the first session.

More information can be found on the Adorno and Identity University of California, Berkeley’s Department of Rhetoric event webpage.

Recordings of these seminars can be found on the Adorno and Identity Seminars website.