Announcing Critical Theory in Times of Crisis | 2016-2017 Working Group Series

The term critique derives from the Greek krísis, whose semantic range includes “turning point,” a “decision or judgment,” and the act of separating or distinguishing, underscoring both the evental character of critique and its diagnostic function. Critical Theory itself evinces this relation: Frankfurt School thought emerged as a response to historical crisis. Likewise, contemporary forms of critical theory from critical race theory to eco-criticism respond to crises but also produce an undoing of the status quo. Today it seems we are living in a time of multiplying catastrophes: the refugee, economic, and environmental crises, and an emerging threat of neo-nationalist or neo-fascist movements. Against this backdrop, Critical Theory in Times of Crisis is interested in exploring the relations of crisis and critique: How can we define the liaison between the world-historical and critical practices? How does critical theory both respond to crises and grow away from them? What forms does it recuperate or invent? What is the temporality of critique? Is critique always retrospective and belated, or can it be simultaneous or even anticipatory? How can critique inform or produce action—be it aesthetic or political? These questions will allow us to think about the relational existence of crisis and critique in its various spatial, temporal, and historical moments.

To register and receive readings, please contact critical_theory@berkeley.edu.

Organized by Critical Theory D.E. student Christopher P. Scott through the Program in Critical Theory.