• Graduate Seminar with Michael Warner

    Michael Warner, Professor of English and American Studies, Yale University

    • 05 February, 2010, 1:30 pm - 3:30 pm
    • 3335 Dwinelle Hall, UC Berkeley
  • A luncheon seminar for graduate students. Sandwiches and coffee will be provided.

    As background reading for Professor Warner’s talk, “Sex & Secularity,” and for our seminar discussion, please try to read Max Weber, ‘Religious Rejections of the World and their Directions,’ AND Michael Warner, ‘Tongues Untied: Memoirs of a Pentecostal Boyhood.’

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  • Sex & Secularity

    Michael Warner, Professor of English and American Studies, Yale University

    • 05 February, 2010, 4:30 pm - 6:30 pm
    • 3335 Dwinelle Hall, UC Berkeley
  • Professor Warner will be introduced by Wendy Brown (Political Science), and Saba Mahmood (Anthropology) will offer a short response after his talk.

    Michael Warner is Seymour H. Knox Professor of English and American Studies at Yale, and chair of the department of English. His books include Publics and Counterpublics (2002); The Trouble with Normal (1999); and The Letters of the Republic: Publication and the Public Sphere in Eighteenth-Century America (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1990).

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  • Carnivorous Virility, or Becoming-Dog

    Carla Freccero, Professor of Literature, Feminist Studies and History of Consciousness, UC Santa Cruz

    • 11 February, 2010, 5:15 pm - 7:00 pm
    • 3335 Dwinelle Hall, UC Berkeley
  • This talk argues for a queering of temporality that would undo nationally circumscribed and periodized fields of literary study in order to work through topoi–discursive commonplaces–that haunt texts across historical eras. My case study involves cynanthropy, the merger of human and dog; it takes as its starting point the Columbian New World encounter, from reports of dog-headed cannibals to accounts of the devouring dog as the ubiquitous companion/weapon of Spanish colonizers; and concludes with the attack of Diane Whipple by two Presa Canarios in San Francisco in 2001.

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  • Queer Childhood: Clinical, Fictive, Autobiographical – A Lecture in Three Movements and Three Moods

    Ken Corbett, Assistant Professor in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis, New York University

    • 24 February, 2010, 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm
    • 370 Dwinelle Hall, UC Berkeley
  • Respondents: Gayle Salamon (Assistant Professor of English, Princeton) Daniel Boyarin (Tauman Professor of Talmudic Culture, Departments of Near Eastern Studies and Rhetoric, UC Berkeley).

    Ken Corbett is Assistant Professor at the New York University Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis. He is the author of Boyhoods: Rethinking Masculinities (Yale University Press, 2009).

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  • Situating Feminism

    Gayatri Spivak, Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University

    • 26 February, 2010, 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
    • Maude Fife Room, 315 Wheeler Hall, UC Berkeley
  • Lecture by Gayatri Spivak presented by the Beatrice Bain Research Group Co-sponsored by the Department of Comparative Literature, the Department of Rhetoric, the Department of Sociology, the Department of Gender and Women’s Studies- Li Ka Shing, the Department of South and Southeast Asian Studies, the English Department, the Townsend Center for the Humanities, the Center for Race and Gender, the Center for South Asia Studies, the Department of Gender and Women’s Studies, the Department of Geography, and the Designated Emphasis in Critical Theory.

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  • Conjunctures of Performance and Philosophy

    Hans-Thies Lehmann, Professor of Theater Studies, Goethe-University, Germany & Freddie Rokem, Professor of Theater Studies, Tel Aviv University, Israel

    • 09 March, 2010, 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
    • 370 Dwinelle Hall, UC Berkeley
  • World-renowned performance theorists Professors Hans-Thies Lehmann and Freddie Rokem visit UC Berkeley on March 9th to examine the often- fraught relationship between performance and philosophy as it plays out both on stage and in scholarship. With its emphasis on practice, embodiment, and presence, performance has often been the object of consternation for philosophers. Similarly, performance practitioners remain wary of the theoretical interpretations and the philosophical implications of their work. Yet, despite these seeming tensions, performance and philosophy remain entwined in a mutually reinforcing capacity.

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  • Rape: Notes Toward a Moral Ontology of the Body

    J.M. Bernstein, Professor of Philosophy, New School for Social Research

    • 15 March, 2010, 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm
    • 370 Dwinelle Hall, UC Berkeley
  • J.M. Bernstein is University Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at the New School for Social Research. He works primarily in the areas of aesthetics and the philosophy of art, ethics, critical theory, and German Idealism. Among his books are: The Philosophy of the Novel; The Fate of Art: Aesthetic Alienation from Kant to Derrida and Adorno; Adorno: Disenchantment and Ethics; Against Voluptuous Bodies: Late Modernism and the Meaning of Painting; he edited and wrote the introduction for Classic and Romantic German Aesthetics.

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  • Graduate Seminar

    J.M. Bernstein, Professor of Philosophy, New School for Social Research

    • 16 March, 2010, 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
  • A seminar for graduate students. Participation limited to twenty students.

    J.M. Bernstein is University Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at the New School for Social Research. He works primarily in the areas of aesthetics and the philosophy of art, ethics, critical theory, and German Idealism. Among his books are: The Philosophy of the Novel; The Fate of Art: Aesthetic Alienation from Kant to Derrida and Adorno; Adorno: Disenchantment and Ethics; Against Voluptuous Bodies: Late Modernism and the Meaning of Painting; he edited and wrote the introduction for Classic and Romantic German Aesthetics.

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  • Migration, Law, and the Image: Beyond the Veil of Ignorance

    W. J. T. Mitchell, Professor of English and Art History, University of Chicago

    • 18 March, 2010, 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
    • Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall, UC Berkeley
  • W. J. T. Mitchell is Professor of English and Art History at the University of Chicago. He is editor of the interdisciplinary journal, Critical Inquiry, a quarterly devoted to critical theory in the arts and human sciences. A scholar and theorist of media, visual art, and literature, Mitchell is associated with the emergent fields of visual culture and iconology (the study of images across the media). He is known especially for his work on the relations of visual and verbal representations in the context of social and political issues.

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  • Idolatry: Nietzsche, Blake, Poussin

    W. J. T. Mitchell, Professor of English and Art History, University of Chicago

    • 19 March, 2010, 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
    • 3401 Dwinelle Hall, UC Berkeley
  • A seminar for graduate students. Please sign up in advance if you plan on attending this seminar. Enrollment is limited to 20 students.

    W. J. T. Mitchell is Professor of English and Art History at the University of Chicago. He is editor of the interdisciplinary journal, Critical Inquiry, a quarterly devoted to critical theory in the arts and human sciences. A scholar and theorist of media, visual art, and literature, Mitchell is associated with the emergent fields of visual culture and iconology (the study of images across the media).

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  • Religion and Progressive Politics

    Steven H. Shiffrin, Senior Professor of Law, Cornell Law School

    • 07 April, 2010, 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm
    • 3335 Dwinelle Hall, UC Berkeley
  • Professor Shiffrin will be introduced by Prof. Kathy Abrams (Law School) and Prof. Wendy Brown (Political Science) will offer a short response after his talk.

    Steven H. Shiffrin is Charles Frank Reavis, Sr. Professor of Law at the Cornell Law School. Professor Shiffrin is the author of Dissent, Injustice, and the Meanings of America, Princeton University Press, 1999, and The First Amendment, Democracy, and Romance, Harvard Press, 1990, (winner of the Thomas J. Wilson Award).

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  • The Religious Left, the Secular Left, and the Religion Clauses

    Steven H. Shiffrin, Senior Professor of Law, Cornell Law School

    • 08 April, 2010, 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
    • Dean's Seminar Room, Boalt Hall, UC Berkeley
  • Steven H. Shiffrin is Charles Frank Reavis, Sr. Professor of Law at the Cornell Law School. Professor Shiffrin is the author of Dissent, Injustice, and the Meanings of America, Princeton University Press, 1999, and The First Amendment, Democracy, and Romance, Harvard Press, 1990, (winner of the Thomas J. Wilson Award). His writings have appeared in many publications, including the Harvard Law Review, the Michigan Law Review, the UCLA Law Review, and the New York Times Book Review. His most recent book is The Religious Left and Church-State Relations, Princeton Press, 2009.

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  • Reality as Palimpsest: On Benjamin’s Arcades Project

    Howard Eiland, Lecturer in Literature, Massachussets Institute of Technology

    • 15 April, 2010, 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm
    • 3335 Dwinelle Hall, UC Berkeley
  • Howard Eiland has been involved since the late nineteen-eighties with the multi-volume Harvard University Press edition of the works of Walter Benjamin, an influential German writer who died in 1940 while in flight from the Nazis. He co-edited three volumes of Benjamin’s Selected Writings and co-translated Benjamin’s Arcades Project, and he has also translated Benjamin’s Berlin Childhood around 1900 and his On Hashish. He is presently collaborating on a biography of Benjamin and preparing a translation of Benjamin’s early writings. He is a Lecturer in Literature at MIT.

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  • Focal Point: Walter Benjamin’s Idea of Youth

    Howard Eiland, Lecturer in Literature, Massachussets Institute of Technology

    • 16 April, 2010, 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
    • 3401 Dwinelle Hall, UC Berkeley
  • A seminar for graduate students. If you wish to attend, please sign up in advance. Enrollment is limited to 20 students.

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  • Times of Engagement: International Strategies of Rule and Liberation Struggles

    Samera Esmeir, Assistant Professor of Rhetoric, UC Berkeley

    • 05 May, 2010, 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm
    • 370 Dwinelle Hall, UC Berkeley
  • The Department of Rhetoric and the Center for Middle Eastern Studies Present Samera Esmeir, Assistant Professor, Department of Rhetoric.

    A former lawyer, Samera Esmeir received her Ph.D. in Law and Society from New York University. She works on the contemporary Middle East, specifically on questions of violence, war, and the security state.

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